Art in Public Spaces

Handbook of Operating Procedures 4-1290

Art in Public Spaces

I. Policy Statement 

Art in public spaces controlled by The University of Texas at Austin ("University") should serve to educate and enrich the lives of students, faculty, staff, alumni, the local community, and visitors.

II. Reason for Policy 

To establish a process for reviewing and funding art proposed for installation in public spaces.

III. Scope & Audience 

This policy applies to individuals seeking to place art in public spaces on property belonging to the University.  This policy does not create a right to access or use University property beyond that provided by applicable University of Texas Board of Regents’ Rules, including Rule 80101, and applicable state, federal, and local law

IV. Definitions (specific to this policy) 
Art:

Two- or three-dimensional works of art, monuments, statues, installations, or works of a performative or transmedia nature created or considered for installations in public spaces, excluding acquisition activities of the Blanton Museum of Art, Harry Ransom Center, The Visual Arts Center, Texas Memorial Museum, and other curated and archived exhibitions and collections. Art included in temporary exhibits located in spaces controlled by these units are specified in the University’s 2008 Public Art Master Plan and are not subject to this policy.

Art Allocation:

The amount allocated to Landmarks from the capital cost of a Capital Improvement Project to be used by Landmarks to acquire works of art for its collection. The current amount taken is 1 - 2% of the capital cost of the Capital Improvement Project.

Art Allocation/Recovery of Other Cost:

In addition to direct acquisition cost, Landmarks may recover from the Art Allocation other costs associated with the successful launch of a public art project. These costs may include expenditures incurred by Landmarks for research, coordination, management, education, and public outreach. In general, such cost shall not exceed 15% of the Art Allocation, or $25,000 if the applicable Capital Improvement Project cost is less than $25 million. In such cases where the Recovery of Other Cost exceeds these specified limits, written approval from the dean of the College of Fine Arts and associate vice president for Campus Planning and Project Management is required.

Campus Master Plan Committee:

The committee established by the 2012 Campus Master Plan to assure consistent and reliable compliance with master plan design guidelines. Members include individuals with a strong professional and institutional knowledge for evaluating proposed building designs and associated elements.

Capital Improvement Project:

The new construction or a major renovation of an academic teaching and/or research facility, an administrative building, or any general-purpose building on University property.

Faculty Building Advisory Committee:

The committee representing faculty, staff, and students in matters related to the planning and programming of buildings. The committee solicits and serves as the conduit for campus-wide faculty input into the nature and direction of existing building initiatives and the broader building planning process on campus and conveys those concerns to all affected stakeholders.

Landmarks Art Committee:

The committee whose charge is to make recommendations and review art for inclusion in the Landmarks collection. The LAC serves in an advisory capacity and shares feedback with the Landmarks director.

Landmarks:

The University's public art program. Landmarks holds a collection of public art works across the University campus that is broadly accessible and free to all. The program is curated by a director and operates within the College of Fine Arts.

Non-programmatic Art Proposals:

Proposals submitted by a representative of a college, school or unit on campus, donor, or other affiliated entity; a proposal that does not arise from Landmarks.

Public Spaces:

All sites exterior to buildings and interiors generally open and accessible to people, such as entrances, atria, trafficked corridors, and reception areas for the public. Public spaces typically do not include areas such as conference rooms and private offices.

Sites:

Main campus, Pickle Research Campus, Brackenridge Field Laboratory, Stengl "Lost Pines" Biological Station, McDonald Observatory, Marine Science Institute, Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center, Dell Medical School, and any other University controlled property accessible to the public.

Subcommittee for the Review of Art:

A subcommittee of the Campus Master Plan Committee (“CMPC”) comprised of knowledgeable art academics and professionals who review the Non-programmatic Art Proposals. The name of the subcommittee’s chairperson can be found by contacting the chairperson of the CMPC or the director of Landmarks.

V. Website (for policy) 
https://policies.utexas.edu/policies/hop/4-1290
VI. Contacts 
Contact Details Web
Senior Vice President and Chief Financial OfficerPhone:512-471-1422Website:
LandmarksPhone:512-495-4315Website:
VII. Responsibilities & Procedures 

Landmarks Public Art

 

  1. Public Art Funding

Following the standards established by many other public universities, the University has committed to a public art funding policy that sets aside 1 - 2% of Capital Improvement Project ("CIP") budgets for the purpose of acquiring works of public art.

 

  1. Public Art Allocations
  1. Art Allocations and Recovery of Other Costs are managed by Landmarks.
  1. Building projects that qualify for the Art Allocation shall designate a minimum of 1% of the CIP budget to the Art Allocation, with a goal of 2% when possible. A project qualifies for the Art Allocation if:
  1. The project is new construction or a major renovation;
  1. The project is at least partially funded by the University;
  1. The facility supports an academic, administrative, or research function; and
  1. The site has interior or exterior spaces accessible to the public.
  1. Committee Composition
  1. The Landmarks Art Committee ("LAC") shall consist of seven members. The members will include the Landmarks director, who is appointed by the dean of the College of Fine Arts, an Art History faculty member, a Studio Art faculty member, an Architecture faculty member, a University museum professional, a graduate student, and the chairperson for the Subcommittee for the Review of Art ("SRA").
  1. The Landmarks director will propose the selection of members in consultation with the appropriate unit heads (chairperson of the Art and Art History department, dean of the School of Architecture, museum directors, and others when appropriate).
  1. Committee selections require the approval of the dean of the College of Fine Arts.
  1. Members will serve for up to two consecutive three-year terms.
  1. The Landmarks director shall convene at least three annual meetings of the LAC; meetings may be conducted electronically, if appropriate. The purpose of these meetings shall be to:
  1. Review possible artists for commissions and works to acquire;
  1. Evaluate options and endorse appropriate projects; and
  1. Provide recommendations included in a written proposal for each project.
  1. Meetings may also include additional persons deemed appropriate by the Landmarks director, including building project clients, architects, contractors, or professional experts.
  1. In addition to routine meetings, the LAC may be called upon to review time-sensitive opportunities for public art. In the event that standing LAC members are unavailable to attend, the Landmarks director shall convene a qualified group with appropriate substitute representation (as determined by the Landmarks director) in order to evaluate such time-sensitive opportunities.
  1. Proposal Review and Approval
  1. Proposals are initiated by the Landmarks director.
  1. Proposals are reviewed by LAC. The LAC serves in an advisory capacity and their feedback is shared with the Landmarks director.
  1. After LAC review, Landmarks shall submit proposals to the CMPC that includes endorsements and/or dissenting opinions from the LAC and other relevant parties, with a copy to the senior vice president and chief financial officer.
  1. The CMPC will be responsible for submitting a report with its recommendation to the University president, with a copy to the Landmarks director.
  1. If the art is a gift, Regental approval may be required and the process for approval is set forth by Regents' Rule 60101.
  1. Decisions by the president and/or the Board of Regents will be communicated in writing from the president to the CMPC, with a copy to the associate vice president for Campus Planning and Project Management, the senior vice president and chief financial officer, and the Landmarks director. If the proposal involves artwork to be donated, the Development Office will be responsible for notifying the donor of the decision.
  1. Landmarks may be called upon to make an annual presentation to the Faculty Building Advisory Committee ("FBAC"), but it is not required that the FBAC endorse or approve submitted proposals.

Non-programmatic Art Proposals

 

  1. Committee Composition
  1. The SRA shall consist of eight members.
  1. The chairperson of the Department of Art and Art History will appoint the chairperson of the SRA, who will be a faculty member of the Department of Art and Art History.
  1. Additional members will include an Art History faculty member, a Studio Art faculty member, an Architecture faculty member, a University museum professional, the Landmarks director, a graduate student, and one other member deemed qualified by the chairperson of the SRA.
  1. The SRA chairperson will propose the selection of members in consultation with the appropriate unit heads (chairperson of the Art and Art History department, dean of the School of Architecture, museum directors, and others when appropriate). All SRA committee selections require the approval of the dean of the College of Fine Arts.
  1. SRA members shall serve for up to two consecutive three-year terms.
  1. Meetings may include additional persons deemed appropriate by the SRA chairperson, including building project clients, architects, contractors, or professional experts.
  1. The SRA will meet according to each circumstance and meetings may be conducted electronically, if appropriate.
  1. Approval Process
  1. The requesting unit must submit a proposal to the senior vice president and chief financial officer, or the chairperson of the SRA with a copy to the senior vice president and chief financial officer. Information submitted should include the scope of the project, rationale, artist biography, proposed site location, size, material, maintenance plan, anticipated costs and any available renderings or photographs. 
  1. The SRA will review and share its recommendation with the CMPC, with a copy each to the senior vice president and chief financial officer and the Landmarks director.
  1. The CMPC will be responsible for submitting a report with its recommendation to the president with a copy to Landmarks.
  1. If the art is a gift, Regental approval may be required and the process set forth by Regents Rule 60101 will be followed.
  1. Decisions will be communicated in writing from the president to the CMPC with copies to the senior vice president and chief financial officer, associate vice president for Campus Planning and Project Management, SRA, and the Landmarks director. All accepted proposals must conform to the Public Art Master Plan that is maintained by Landmarks.
  1. The SRA may be called upon to make an annual presentation to the FBAC, but it is not required that the FBAC endorse or approve submitted proposals.
VIII. Forms & Tools 

https://landmarks.utexas.edu/sites/files/landmarks/Landmarks_Public_Art_Master_Plan.pdf

Contact the chairperson of the Department of Art and Art History to obtain the name of the chair of the Subcommittee for the Review of Art and guidelines for proposals.

XI. History 

Previously: HOP 2.A.5

Reviewed and edited: January 18, 2019

Next Scheduled review: January, 2021